Clermont County gives more than 90,000 pieces of PPE to schools

September 1, 2020

BATAVAIA, OHClermont County Public Health and the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) have handed out more than 90,000 pieces of personal protective equipment to area schools to help them prepare for the start of the school year.

As schools resume in-person learning, all students, faculty and staff in K-12 schools are required to wear face coverings under the Ohio Department of Health order that was issued on August 13.

“We have been working closely with all of our schools to create plans for starting school as safely as possible,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “Having the appropriate PPE is crucial to keeping students, faculty and staff safe.”

Some of the PPE that has been handed out to Clermont County schools so far  includes:

  • 32,000 KN90 masks
  • 24,000 surgical masks
  • 23,500 protective gloves
  • 6,500 cloth masks
  • 3,900 face shields
  • 1,000 KN95 masks
  • 180 no-touch thermometers

The KN90 masks were part of the 2 million masks that the Ohio Emergency Management Agency distributed for Ohio’s schools earlier in August.

“School budgets are already tight, so we hope this PPE will protect the students and staff, while also easing the burden put on school budgets,” said Pam Haverkos, director of the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency.

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Clermont County moves to a level two public health advisory

Clermont County has moved back to a level two (orange) advisory under the Ohio Public Health Advisory System. The advisory system, first introduced on July 2, uses a set of seven indicators to measure how much COVID-19 is spreading in each of Ohio’s 88 counties. On July 9, Clermont County was elevated from a level two to a level three advisory.

On July 30, Clermont County moved from a level three back down to a level two advisory.
On August 13, Clermont County moved from a level two back to a level three advisory.
The risk levels under the advisory are determined by seven alert indicators. Those indicators are:

• New cases per capita
• A sustained increase in new cases
• Proportion of cases that are not in congregate living facilities
• A sustained increase in emergency room visits
• A sustained increase in outpatient visits
• A sustained increase in new COVID-19 hospital admissions
• Intensive care unit bed occupancy

As of August 27, Clermont County met two of the seven indicators. Those indicators are:

  • The number of new cases per capita
  • The proportion of cases that are not in congregate living facilities

For more information on each of the seven alert indicators, click here.

A county that meets 2 or 3 of the above indicators will be under a level 2 (orange) emergency.
A county that meets 4 or 5 of the above indicators will be under a level 3 (red) emergency.

As of August 27, Clermont County met the threshold for 5 of the 7 indicators including:

For a list of all the data used to make this determination for Clermont County, click here.

Clermont County moves to level 3 advisory

Governor DeWine announced on August 13 that Clermont County is under a level 3 Public Emergency under the Ohio Public Health Advisory System. The advisory system was first introduced by Governor Mike DeWine on July 2. The advisory system is a color-coded system that can be used by local communities to help make decisions based on the COVID-19 risk level for each county.

The risk levels are determined by seven alert indicators. Those indicators are:

  • New cases per capita
  • A sustained increase in new cases
  • Proportion of cases not in congregate living facilities
  • A sustained increase in emergency room visits
  • A sustained increase in outpatient visits
  • A sustained increase in new COVID-19 hospital admissions
  • Intensive Care Unit bed occupancy

For more information on each of the seven alert indicators, click here.

A county that meets 2 or 3 of the above indicators will be under a level 2 (orange) emergency.

A county that meets 4 or 5 of the above indicators will be under a level 3 (red) emergency.

As of August 13, Clermont County met the threshold for 5 of the 7 indicators including:

  • New cases per capita
  • Proportion of cases not in a congregate setting
  • A sustained increase in emergency room visits for COVID-like illness
  • A sustained increase in outpatient visits for COVID-like illness
  • A sustained increase in new COVID hospital admissions

For a list of all of the data used to make this determination for Clermont County, click here.

Clermont County drops to a level two advisory

Governor Mike DeWine announced the weekly changes to the Ohio Public Health Advisory System. The advisory system, first introduced on July 2, uses a set of seven indicators to measure how much COVID-19 is spreading in each of Ohio’s 88 counties. On July 9, Clermont County was elevated from a level two (orange) advisory to a level three (red advisory).

The seven indicators used for determining the advisory level for each county are:

• The number of new cases per capita (more than 50 per 100,000 residents over the last two weeks).

• A sustained increase in new cases – at least five consecutive days in overall new cases over the last three weeks.

• A proportion of cases not in a congregate setting – the proportion of cases that are not in a congregate setting goes over 50 percent.

• Increase in emergency department visits for COVID- like illness (increasing trend of at least five days over the previous three weeks).

• Sustained increase in outpatient visits for COVID-like illness. (trend of at least five consecutive days over the previous three weeks of people going to a health care provider for COVID symptoms who receive a COVID diagnosis

• Sustained increase in new COVID hospital admissions – increasing trend of at least five consecutive days in the number of COVID hospitalizations over the last three weeks.

• Intensive Care Unit bed occupancy – the percentage of occupied ICU beds in each region goes above 80 percent for at least three days in the last week, and more than 20 percent of ICU beds are being used for COVID positive patients.


At the July 23, announcement, Clermont County remained at a level three and met five of the above seven indicators.

When the announcement was made on July 30, Clermont County met only two of the seven indicators (non-congregate cases and outpatient visits)

 

Indicators met by week
July 23 July 30
New cases per capita     – MET New cases per capita
Sustained increase in new cases- MET Sustained increase in new cases
Cases not in a congregate setting – MET Cases not in a congregate setting – MET
Increase in ED visits  – MET Increase in ED visits
Increase in outpatient visits – MET Increase in outpatient visits – MET
Increase in new COVID hospital admissions Increase in new COVID hospital admissions
ICU bed occupancy ICU bed occupancy

 

The advisory levels are updated each Thursday at 2 p.m. during Governor DeWine’s press conference.

Clermont County under a level 3 public emergency

Governor Mike DeWine announced on July 9, 2020 that Clermont County was at a level 3 Public Emergency under the new Ohio Public Health Advisory System.

The new advisory system is a color-coded system that can be used by local communities to help make decisions based on the COVID-19 risk level for each county.

The risk levels are determined by seven alert indicators. Those indicators are:

  • New cases per capita
  • Sustained increase in new cases
  • Proportion of cases not in congregate living facilities (ex. Nursing homes, long-term care facilities, jails or prisons).
  • Sustained increase in emergency room visits
  • Sustained increase in outpatient visits
  • Sustained increase in new COVID-19 hospital admissions
  • Intensive Care Unit bed occupancy

For more information on each of the seven alert indicators, click here.

A county that meets 4 or 5 of the above indicators will be under a level 3 public emergency.

As of July 7, Clermont County met the threshold for 5 of the 7 indicators including:

  • Sustained increase in new cases
  • Proportion of cases not in congregate living facilities
  • Emergency room visits
  • Outpatient visits
  • ICU bed occupancy

For a list of the full Clermont County data profile, click here.

Under the new guidance, all counties under a level 3 public emergency will have a mask order. Citizens are required to wear masks inside buildings or outside where social distancing is not possible. The order takes effect in Clermont County at 6 p.m. on July 10, 2020.

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Clermont County cases of COVID-19 increasing

Batavia, OH – As more businesses across Ohio begin to reopen, new cases of COVID-19 have been increasing in Clermont County and southwest Ohio. Clermont County Public Health urges residents to continue to take precautions against the virus.

“Now that summer is here, we know that people are anxious for life to return to normal,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “But, this virus will be with us for a while, and the changes we are all making to our lifestyle need to be long-term changes to prevent the spread.”

Clermont County Public Health urges people to continue to follow these guidelines to help stop the spread of COVID-19:

  • Avoid large crowds and gatherings.
  • Practice social distancing and keep at least six feet apart from others.
  • Wear a mask or face covering when in public places.
  • Stay home if you are sick.
  • Wash your hands frequently.
  • Cover your cough and sneezes with your elbow.

Testing is now available at several sites in Clermont County and greater Cincinnati. For a list of testing locations, visit www.ccphohio.org. If you feel sick and think you should be tested, call your healthcare provider.

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Clermont County hands out 145,000 pieces of PPE

Clermont County Public Health and the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency have handed out more than 145,000 pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE) to healthcare workers and first responders in Clermont County in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

PPE is necessary for doctors, nurses and other frontline healthcare workers to prevent them from being infected while they’re treating a patient with COVID-19.

Some of the PPE that has been distributed so far includes:

  • 90,000 gloves
  • 29,000 surgical masks
  • 9,000 N95 respirators
  • 7,500 cloth masks
  • 6,000 face shields
  • 1,200 protective gowns

“We know there has been a limited supply of PPE across the country,” said Pam Haverkos, director of the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency. “The shipments we have received will fill the void and allow local agencies extra time to purchase their necessary supply of PPE, as the supply chain increases,” said Pam Haverkos, director of the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency.

CCPH has received 11 shipments of PPE so far from a combination of the Nation’s Strategic National Stockpile and the State of Ohio’s Emergency Operations Center.

Clermont County Public Health also hosted two donation drives in March where local businesses, school districts and citizens could donate their PPE.

In total, EMA has distributed PPE 154 times to local fire departments, police departments, nursing homes, Mercy Clermont Hospital, local healthcare agencies and government agencies.

“Preserving the PPE supply in our healthcare facilities is one of the reasons we’ve been practicing social distancing and staying at home,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “This will be a long-term response, so PPE will always be in high demand for those on the frontlines, but we’re thankful we’ve been able to help our local partners stretch their supply.”

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Public Health here to help businesses reopen

NEWS RELEASE                                                
For Immediate Release                                                       

Public Health here to help businesses reopen

 BATAVIA (OH) – Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) is helping local businesses to reopen with new operating guidelines to help minimize the spread of COVID-19.

As part of Governor Mike DeWine’s Responsible Restart Ohio Plan, salons, spas, and barbershops can reopen May 15. Restaurants with outdoor dining can also reopen beginning May 15, if they follow the guidelines established by the Ohio Department of Health. Indoor dining rooms can open on May 21.

“The new COVID-19 guidelines are new for all of us and will be here for a while,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “We are here as a resource to help our businesses open, but we want to make sure they are operating as safely as possible within the new guidelines.”

Once the Restart Ohio plan was announced CCPH has been getting many phone calls and emails from local businesses asking what they need to do to reopen. Guidelines for each industry vary somewhat, but all businesses must require employees to wear face coverings, provide hand-washing stations or hand sanitizer in common areas, and allow for six feet of space between guests.

“Since openings were announced, we’ve talked to businesses from many different industries, looking for guidance,” said Maalinii Vijayan director of environmental health. The questions are the same for each one. “How can those businesses open safely and within the guidelines?”

CCPH, which licenses nearly 900 restaurants and food facilities in Clermont County, contacted all of those restaurants with the latest guidelines for both indoor and outdoor dining when the reopening announcement was made.

“We already have a relationship with our restaurants, and we’re helping them figure out how to keep customers properly spaced, and follow the other guidelines,” said Vijayan. Restaurants have standard hygiene and sanitation practices they follow, and each one should already have staff members trained in food safety, so some of the guidelines shouldn’t be new.

In addition to businesses, many local schools have been turning to CCPH for guidance on how to host their graduation ceremonies. While mass gatherings and in-person graduations are still prohibited, there are some creative ways schools can celebrate virtually.

“We’ve had meetings with school superintendents and are helping them follow the guidance on graduation ceremonies given by ODH, said Nesbit.” Most of the schools in Clermont County are doing some type of virtual celebration.

“The local businesses we’ve talked to want to offer a safe environment for their employees and customers, and we’re here to help them,” said Nesbit.

Clermont County Public Health receives PPE for frontline workers

BATAVIA (OH) – Clermont County Public Health received a shipment of personal protective equipment (PPE) to help protect frontline health care workers and first responders in Clermont County.

The shipment contained six pallets of PPE that was procured from both state and federal sources. Some of the items included were N-95 respirators, face shields, surgical masks and gloves.

This was the fourth shipment of PPE that Clermont County Public Health has received since the COVID-19 outbreak began. The first three shipments came from the nation’s Strategic National Stockpile, a nationwide supply of medicine and medical supplies that can be used by state and local health departments during a public health emergency.

“The supply of PPE is still limited for healthcare workers, but our efforts to flatten the curve and slow the spread of this virus has helped lessen the immediate demand of equipment for our frontline healthcare workers,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit.

Clermont County Public Health has also hosted two public PPE donation drives and received donations from schools, businesses and citizens.

“We want to thank the State’s Emergency Operation Center for the distribution of PPE,” said Clermont County Emergency Management Director Pam Haverkos. “We will work with Public Health to distribute the supplies to local public safety agencies and healthcare facilities.”

The Clermont County Emergency Management Agency sent surveys to local healthcare facilities and public safety agencies asking what PPE needs each agency has. Those surveys will be used to determine the allotment of equipment each agency receives.

For more information on COVID-19 in Clermont County visit https://ccphohio.org/covid-19/

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More COVID-19 tests available for Clermont County nursing homes

BATAVIA (OH) – Clermont County Public Health received COVID-19 test kits to be used for nursing homes and long-term care facilities in Clermont County.

The test materials came from The Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center. They were part of a shipment that was sent to local health departments throughout Ohio.

While CCPH has the test materials, they do not provide testing for COVID-19. The testing kits are available for nursing homes, long-term care facilities, or other places where people are living together in a congregate setting including the Clermont County Jail.

“We know that testing is still limited in Ohio, but having these tests allow long-term care facilities and nursing homes to have better access to testing with a fast turnaround time,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit.

If a person is tested using these kits, the samples can be sent to the Ohio Department of Health lab in Columbus which provides results within 24 hours or they can be sent to any lab the facility has an agreement with.

“The quicker a test can be performed the sooner a person can be isolated if the test is positive,” said Nesbit.

Due to the limited testing availability statewide, the Ohio Department of Health has listed four priority groups for COVID-19 testing that healthcare providers should follow.

Priority 1

  • Individuals with symptoms who are:
    • Hospitalized.
    • Healthcare workers.

Priority 2

  • Individuals with symptoms who are:
    • In long-term care/congregate living facilities.
    • First responders/critical infrastructure workers.
    • 65 and older.
    • Living with underlying conditions.

  Priority 2a

  • Individuals and staff without symptoms who are:
    • In long-term care/congregate living facilities with an outbreak.

Priority 3

  • Other individuals with symptoms
  • Individuals with mild symptoms in areas with high COVID-19 hospitalizations.

Individuals who are sick and think they may have COVID-19 should call their doctor to ask about getting tested.

For more information on COVID-19 click here.

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