Clermont County moves to a level two (orange) advisory

October 8, 2020

Clermont County has moved back to a level two (orange) advisory under the Ohio Public Health Advisory System. The advisory system, first introduced on July 2, uses a set of seven indicators to measure how much COVID-19 is spreading in each of Ohio’s 88 counties. On October 1, Clermont County was elevated from a level two to a level three advisory.

The risk levels under the advisory are determined by seven alert indicators. Those indicators are:

  • New cases per capita
    • A sustained increase in new cases
    • Proportion of cases that are not in congregate living facilities
    • A sustained increase in emergency room visits
    • A sustained increase in outpatient visits
    • A sustained increase in new COVID-19 hospital admissions
    • Intensive care unit bed occupancy

As of October 8, Clermont County met two of the seven indicators. Those indicators are:

  • The number of new cases per capita
  • The proportion of cases that are not in congregate living facilities
  • A sustained increase in the number of emergency department visits

For more information on each of the seven alert indicators, click here.

A county that meets 2 or 3 of the above indicators will be under a level 2 (orange) emergency.
A county that meets 4 or 5 of the above indicators will be under a level 3 (red) emergency.

For a list of all the data used to make this determination for Clermont County, click here.

Clermont County moves to a level 3 public health advisory

After four weeks at a level 2 (orange) advisory, Clermont County has been moved to a level 3 advisory under the Public Health Advisory System.

“While we never want to see us go into the red, the rate of transmission and spread of the virus in Clermont County has remained fairly constant over the last month, so we are hopeful we can get back into the orange soon.”

The two indicators that triggered the increase from a level two to a level three advisory are related to visits to hospitals and healthcare providers. The ED visit and outpatient visits had been declining over the last few weeks, but recently they have increased. Under the system created by the Ohio Department of Health, a sustained increase of five days within the last three weeks is enough to trigger each of those indicators.

A county that meets four or five of the seven indicators will be placed under a level 3 advisory.

Clermont County meets four of the seven indicators by the Ohio Department of Health. Those indicators are:

  • The number of new cases per capita (62.5 cases per 100,000)
  • The proportion of cases that are not in congregate living facilities
  • A sustained increase in Emergency Department visits
  • A sustained increase in outpatient visits for COVID-like illness

For more information on the Public Health Advisory System, click here

For a full list of the alert indicators, click here

To see the data for Clermont County, click here

“We just want to remind everyone to continue the practices of mask-wearing, social distancing and avoiding crowded areas to continue to limit the spread of the virus,” said Nesbit.
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New COVID-19 data dashboard now online

Clermont County Public Health has a new interactive COVID-19 data dashboard on its website. In addition to the number of confirmed, probable and active cases, the new dashboard includes the following data:

  • A graph of the number of Clermont County residents who are currently hospitalized with COVID-19.
  • The number of COVID-19 cases by age group.
  • The number of cases by gender.
  • A line graph of the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the county by illness onset date.

The new dashboard will be updated on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

In early September, CCPH published a similar dashboard that shows the number of active cases in Clermont County in each zip code. An active case means a person has tested positive and is still considered contagious.

To view the new data dashboard, visit: https://ccphohio.org/covid-19/

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Clermont County gives more than 90,000 pieces of PPE to schools

September 1, 2020

BATAVAIA, OHClermont County Public Health and the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) have handed out more than 90,000 pieces of personal protective equipment to area schools to help them prepare for the start of the school year.

As schools resume in-person learning, all students, faculty and staff in K-12 schools are required to wear face coverings under the Ohio Department of Health order that was issued on August 13.

“We have been working closely with all of our schools to create plans for starting school as safely as possible,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “Having the appropriate PPE is crucial to keeping students, faculty and staff safe.”

Some of the PPE that has been handed out to Clermont County schools so far  includes:

  • 32,000 KN90 masks
  • 24,000 surgical masks
  • 23,500 protective gloves
  • 6,500 cloth masks
  • 3,900 face shields
  • 1,000 KN95 masks
  • 180 no-touch thermometers

The KN90 masks were part of the 2 million masks that the Ohio Emergency Management Agency distributed for Ohio’s schools earlier in August.

“School budgets are already tight, so we hope this PPE will protect the students and staff, while also easing the burden put on school budgets,” said Pam Haverkos, director of the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency.

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Clermont County moves to a level two public health advisory

Clermont County has moved back to a level two (orange) advisory under the Ohio Public Health Advisory System. The advisory system, first introduced on July 2, uses a set of seven indicators to measure how much COVID-19 is spreading in each of Ohio’s 88 counties. On July 9, Clermont County was elevated from a level two to a level three advisory.

On July 30, Clermont County moved from a level three back down to a level two advisory.
On August 13, Clermont County moved from a level two back to a level three advisory.
The risk levels under the advisory are determined by seven alert indicators. Those indicators are:

• New cases per capita
• A sustained increase in new cases
• Proportion of cases that are not in congregate living facilities
• A sustained increase in emergency room visits
• A sustained increase in outpatient visits
• A sustained increase in new COVID-19 hospital admissions
• Intensive care unit bed occupancy

As of August 27, Clermont County met two of the seven indicators. Those indicators are:

  • The number of new cases per capita
  • The proportion of cases that are not in congregate living facilities

For more information on each of the seven alert indicators, click here.

A county that meets 2 or 3 of the above indicators will be under a level 2 (orange) emergency.
A county that meets 4 or 5 of the above indicators will be under a level 3 (red) emergency.

As of August 27, Clermont County met the threshold for 5 of the 7 indicators including:

For a list of all the data used to make this determination for Clermont County, click here.

Clermont County moves to level 3 advisory

Governor DeWine announced on August 13 that Clermont County is under a level 3 Public Emergency under the Ohio Public Health Advisory System. The advisory system was first introduced by Governor Mike DeWine on July 2. The advisory system is a color-coded system that can be used by local communities to help make decisions based on the COVID-19 risk level for each county.

The risk levels are determined by seven alert indicators. Those indicators are:

  • New cases per capita
  • A sustained increase in new cases
  • Proportion of cases not in congregate living facilities
  • A sustained increase in emergency room visits
  • A sustained increase in outpatient visits
  • A sustained increase in new COVID-19 hospital admissions
  • Intensive Care Unit bed occupancy

For more information on each of the seven alert indicators, click here.

A county that meets 2 or 3 of the above indicators will be under a level 2 (orange) emergency.

A county that meets 4 or 5 of the above indicators will be under a level 3 (red) emergency.

As of August 13, Clermont County met the threshold for 5 of the 7 indicators including:

  • New cases per capita
  • Proportion of cases not in a congregate setting
  • A sustained increase in emergency room visits for COVID-like illness
  • A sustained increase in outpatient visits for COVID-like illness
  • A sustained increase in new COVID hospital admissions

For a list of all of the data used to make this determination for Clermont County, click here.

Clermont County drops to a level two advisory

Governor Mike DeWine announced the weekly changes to the Ohio Public Health Advisory System. The advisory system, first introduced on July 2, uses a set of seven indicators to measure how much COVID-19 is spreading in each of Ohio’s 88 counties. On July 9, Clermont County was elevated from a level two (orange) advisory to a level three (red advisory).

The seven indicators used for determining the advisory level for each county are:

• The number of new cases per capita (more than 50 per 100,000 residents over the last two weeks).

• A sustained increase in new cases – at least five consecutive days in overall new cases over the last three weeks.

• A proportion of cases not in a congregate setting – the proportion of cases that are not in a congregate setting goes over 50 percent.

• Increase in emergency department visits for COVID- like illness (increasing trend of at least five days over the previous three weeks).

• Sustained increase in outpatient visits for COVID-like illness. (trend of at least five consecutive days over the previous three weeks of people going to a health care provider for COVID symptoms who receive a COVID diagnosis

• Sustained increase in new COVID hospital admissions – increasing trend of at least five consecutive days in the number of COVID hospitalizations over the last three weeks.

• Intensive Care Unit bed occupancy – the percentage of occupied ICU beds in each region goes above 80 percent for at least three days in the last week, and more than 20 percent of ICU beds are being used for COVID positive patients.


At the July 23, announcement, Clermont County remained at a level three and met five of the above seven indicators.

When the announcement was made on July 30, Clermont County met only two of the seven indicators (non-congregate cases and outpatient visits)

 

Indicators met by week
July 23 July 30
New cases per capita     – MET New cases per capita
Sustained increase in new cases- MET Sustained increase in new cases
Cases not in a congregate setting – MET Cases not in a congregate setting – MET
Increase in ED visits  – MET Increase in ED visits
Increase in outpatient visits – MET Increase in outpatient visits – MET
Increase in new COVID hospital admissions Increase in new COVID hospital admissions
ICU bed occupancy ICU bed occupancy

 

The advisory levels are updated each Thursday at 2 p.m. during Governor DeWine’s press conference.

Clermont County under a level 3 public emergency

Governor Mike DeWine announced on July 9, 2020 that Clermont County was at a level 3 Public Emergency under the new Ohio Public Health Advisory System.

The new advisory system is a color-coded system that can be used by local communities to help make decisions based on the COVID-19 risk level for each county.

The risk levels are determined by seven alert indicators. Those indicators are:

  • New cases per capita
  • Sustained increase in new cases
  • Proportion of cases not in congregate living facilities (ex. Nursing homes, long-term care facilities, jails or prisons).
  • Sustained increase in emergency room visits
  • Sustained increase in outpatient visits
  • Sustained increase in new COVID-19 hospital admissions
  • Intensive Care Unit bed occupancy

For more information on each of the seven alert indicators, click here.

A county that meets 4 or 5 of the above indicators will be under a level 3 public emergency.

As of July 7, Clermont County met the threshold for 5 of the 7 indicators including:

  • Sustained increase in new cases
  • Proportion of cases not in congregate living facilities
  • Emergency room visits
  • Outpatient visits
  • ICU bed occupancy

For a list of the full Clermont County data profile, click here.

Under the new guidance, all counties under a level 3 public emergency will have a mask order. Citizens are required to wear masks inside buildings or outside where social distancing is not possible. The order takes effect in Clermont County at 6 p.m. on July 10, 2020.

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Clermont County cases of COVID-19 increasing

Batavia, OH – As more businesses across Ohio begin to reopen, new cases of COVID-19 have been increasing in Clermont County and southwest Ohio. Clermont County Public Health urges residents to continue to take precautions against the virus.

“Now that summer is here, we know that people are anxious for life to return to normal,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “But, this virus will be with us for a while, and the changes we are all making to our lifestyle need to be long-term changes to prevent the spread.”

Clermont County Public Health urges people to continue to follow these guidelines to help stop the spread of COVID-19:

  • Avoid large crowds and gatherings.
  • Practice social distancing and keep at least six feet apart from others.
  • Wear a mask or face covering when in public places.
  • Stay home if you are sick.
  • Wash your hands frequently.
  • Cover your cough and sneezes with your elbow.

Testing is now available at several sites in Clermont County and greater Cincinnati. For a list of testing locations, visit www.ccphohio.org. If you feel sick and think you should be tested, call your healthcare provider.

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Clermont County hands out 145,000 pieces of PPE

Clermont County Public Health and the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency have handed out more than 145,000 pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE) to healthcare workers and first responders in Clermont County in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

PPE is necessary for doctors, nurses and other frontline healthcare workers to prevent them from being infected while they’re treating a patient with COVID-19.

Some of the PPE that has been distributed so far includes:

  • 90,000 gloves
  • 29,000 surgical masks
  • 9,000 N95 respirators
  • 7,500 cloth masks
  • 6,000 face shields
  • 1,200 protective gowns

“We know there has been a limited supply of PPE across the country,” said Pam Haverkos, director of the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency. “The shipments we have received will fill the void and allow local agencies extra time to purchase their necessary supply of PPE, as the supply chain increases,” said Pam Haverkos, director of the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency.

CCPH has received 11 shipments of PPE so far from a combination of the Nation’s Strategic National Stockpile and the State of Ohio’s Emergency Operations Center.

Clermont County Public Health also hosted two donation drives in March where local businesses, school districts and citizens could donate their PPE.

In total, EMA has distributed PPE 154 times to local fire departments, police departments, nursing homes, Mercy Clermont Hospital, local healthcare agencies and government agencies.

“Preserving the PPE supply in our healthcare facilities is one of the reasons we’ve been practicing social distancing and staying at home,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “This will be a long-term response, so PPE will always be in high demand for those on the frontlines, but we’re thankful we’ve been able to help our local partners stretch their supply.”

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