May 8, 2018

Free bike helmets

May is bicycle safety month across the country. Clermont County Public Health is celebrating by giving out children’s bicycle helmets during the Family Fun Adventure Challenge on Saturday, May 12 at Batavia Township Park, located at 1535 Clough Pike in Batavia. The adventure challenge begins at 10:00 a.m. and Public Health will begin handing out helmets beginning at 10:30 a.m.

According to the National Safety Council, 488,123 people were treated in the emergency room in 2015 from a bicycle injury. That equates to 55 people each hour. Wearing a helmet can reduce the risk of head injury by up to 60 percent.

Public Health staff members will be on hand to make sure each child is properly fitted for the correct size helmet.

For more information on the Family Fun Adventure Challenge, click here.

April 24, 2018

Get muddy at the East Side Adventure Challenge

Batavia, OH (April 24, 2018) – Batavia Township is hosting the third annual East Side Adventure Challenge on Saturday, May 12. The event takes place at 8 a.m. at the Batavia Township Park, 1535 Clough Pike.

The East Side Adventure Challenge is a 1.5-mile obstacle course and mud run. Some of the obstacles include climbing over a pile of tires, crossing a floating bridge, and wading through a giant mud pit – new to this year’s course. The cost of the race is $30 per person and includes a t-shirt and race medal. Groups of 4 or more people can get a special group rate $20 per person if they register together.

“This is the third year for the race, and we’ve tried to make small improvements each year, to make it better and more fun for those that compete,” said Batavia Township Administrator Rex Parsons. “We’re adding a mud pit this year to make sure all of our racers end up muddy.”

“The main goal of this event is to bring the community together and raise money for local charities,” said Parsons. In its first two years, the event has raised more than $8,000 which has been donated back to local charities. In 2017, the proceeds went to the Clermont County Chapter of the Vietnam Vets, KlickWow, Shop with a Sheriff, Opiate Task Force, and Young Life Ministries.

There is a race for young kids too. The Family Fun Adventure Challenge takes place at 10 a.m. and is a shorter version of the course, with fewer obstacles and less mud. “The family event is a great way for families to get outside, and get active together,” said Parsons.

After the race, families can enjoy the family fun zone, with food, vendors, and a rock-climbing wall. Clermont County Public Health will be giving out free bike helmets too.

To register for either the East Side Adventure Challenge or the Family Fun Adventure Challenge visit http://bit.ly/ESAC18.

April 23, 2018

We need your input

Clermont County Public Health is teaming up with several local health-related agencies and wants to know what you think about the health of your community. The Health Collaborative – a local non-profit group dedicated to making Greater Cincinnati healthier is leading a series of meetings in Clermont County to help shape the future of healthcare in your community.

Three meetings are being held in Clermont County on the following dates:

May 1, 2018
6-7:30 p.m.
Clermont County Public Library
Miami Township Branch
5920 Buckwheat Road
Milford, OH 45150

May 2, 2018
6-7:30 p.m.
Clermont County Public Library
Felicity Branch
209 Prather Road
Felicity, OH 45120

May 3, 2018
6-7:30 p.m.
Batavia Township Community Center
1535 Clough Pike
Batavia, OH 45103

Everyone is invited to attend and give their opinion on Clermont County’s top health needs, what you can do to improve health, and any barriers to receiving healthcare. Everyone who attends will automatically be entered into a random drawing for a $10 gift card from Walmart.

Other partners for the Community Health Needs Assessment include Mercy Health, TriHealth, UC Health, The Christ Hospital, Lindner Center of HOPE and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.

If you would like to attend, please RSVP to the Health Collaborative at 513-878-2862 or rsvp@healthcollab.org.

View event flier here.

March 6, 2018

Syringe Services Program Begins at Mercy Health – Clermont Hospital

(CINCINNATI; February 27, 2018) – Mercy Health – Cincinnati, which provides advanced, quality, compassionate care in your neighborhood through its care network, announces that Clermont Hospital is partnering with Clermont County Public Health and Hamilton County Public Health to offer a free syringe services program starting March 1.

The Exchange Project van, which is operated by Hamilton County Public Health, will visit the Clermont Hospital campus every Thursday from 10 a.m.–1 p.m. The hospital is located at 3000 Hospital Drive, Batavia, Ohio 45103.

In addition to providing access to sterile syringes, the program also offers testing and referral to treatment for HIV and Hepatitis C, education on prevention of infection and an access point to substance use disorder counseling and treatment programs. The program also provides naloxone, also known as Narcan, an opiate overdose reversal medication.

“A syringe services program is one more tool that we can use in the fight against opioid addiction. By providing resources such as referral to treatment and testing for HIV and hepatitis C, we can address other issues that accompany drug addiction,” said Julianne Nesbit, Clermont County Health Commissioner. “We are very fortunate to have a good partnership in place with Hamilton County Public Health and Mercy Health – Clermont Hospital to offer this valuable service.”

The needle exchange program, also known as a blood-borne infectious disease prevention program, is part of a wider comprehensive public health/harm reduction program.

“By providing access to sterile syringes to people who inject drugs, we can help reduce the spread of communicable diseases, such as hepatitis and HIV. Reported cases of hepatitis C, an infectious disease that can quickly transmit through injection drug use, increased by 40 percent in the last five years in Clermont County. During the same time period, the number of people living with HIV in Clermont County increased by 27%,” said Stephen Feagins, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Mercy Health’s East market. “Harm reduction efforts, such as syringe service programs, have been shown to have a positive impact in these areas.”

Approximately one in three people ages 18-30 who inject drugs has hepatitis C and hepatitis C kills more Americans than any other infectious disease. For those who live with the disease, the medication cost alone to treat one case of hepatitis C is $84,000. The lifetime cost of treating one person living with HIV is $400,000. By contrast, the estimated cost of the Clermont County’s needle exchange program is $42,000 annually, with Mercy Health Foundation and Clermont County Public Health funding the program.

Other benefits of a syringe services program include:

  • Making used syringes valuable. People can exchange them for new ones, rather than discarding them in public areas.
  • Connecting people with treatment. People who inject drugs are five times as likely to enter treatment for substance use disorder when they use a syringe services program.
  • Reducing accidental needle stick injuries among first responders by providing proper disposal.

For more information about Clermont County Public Health’s syringe services program, visit http://www.clermonthealthdistrict.org/syringeservices.aspx. For more information on The Exchange Project, visit https://www.facebook.com/hc.xchange/.

February 22, 2018

Board of Health closes hotel pool and spa

Board of Health closes hotel pool and spa

The Clermont County Board of Health has closed the pool and spa at the Ameristay Inn and Suites at 2188 Winemiller Road in Batavia. The decision was made at the February 14 monthly Board of Health meeting. The decision to revoke the license and close the pool was based on a pattern of code violations, and the failure by the hotel staff to comply with the Ohio Public Swimming Pool, Spa and Special Use Pool rules and regulations.

“We have been working with the operator of the pool and hotel, Mr. Raaj Patel since October to bring the pool into compliance with ongoing unresolved and continued violations,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “Unfortunately, Mr. Patel’s continued failure to comply with Ohio law regarding public swimming pools has forced us to close the pool to prevent anyone from getting sick or injured.”

“The hotel does not currently have any staff members that are familiar with the basic operations of a public swimming pool and spa,” said Nesbit. “Until Mr. Patel, can show that the pool and spa can be properly maintained with correct water chemistry, the pool will remain closed”. The spa was already closed due to mechanical issues.

All public swimming pools and spas in Ohio are required to be licensed by their local health department, and provide a daily log showing that the water chemistry of the pool is maintained within proper levels by a knowledgeable staff person.

Clermont County Public Health inspects 162 public swimming pools located in the county, and all inspection reports can be found here.

# # #

January 9, 2018

Seasonal flu is on the rise in Clermont County

January 9, 2018

Batavia, Ohio – The new year is bringing more cases of the flu with it. The flu is now widespread in Ohio and 45 other states. According to the Ohio Department of Health, there have been 2,104 hospitalizations in Ohio since the beginning of flu season. More than 900 of those came during the last week of 2017 alone. Last year, at the same time, there were only 369 hospitalizations.

In Clermont County, there have been 74 people admitted to the hospital for the flu, through the first week of January. “Like the rest of the state, we are seeing an increase in flu activity earlier in the season than usual,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “The best way to protect yourself and your family is to get vaccinated.”

If you haven’t received your flu shot yet, there is still time. Clermont County Public Health is offering flu shots by appointment by calling 513-735-8400. Appointments can be scheduled on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays between 9 a.m. and 3:30 p.m.

The Centers for Disease Control recommends everyone six months of age or older get an annual flu shot.

“We still have the vaccine, and want to protect as many people as possible,” said Nesbit.

In addition to getting vaccinated, you can also protect yourself by preventing the spread of germs.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Cover your nose and mouth when you cough or sneeze.
  • Avoid close contact with sick people.
  • Stay home if you are sick.# # #
November 27, 2017

Clermont County Public Health earns accreditation

NEWS RELEASE                                               
November 27, 2017
For Immediate Release
 

Clermont County Public Health earns accreditation

 Batavia, Ohio – Clermont County Public Health has achieved national accreditation through the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB). The accreditation program works to improve the quality and performance of the nation’s public health departments.

The national accreditation program is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. To become accredited, an agency must show that they meet or exceed a set of standards, by going through a self-assessment, and a peer review.

“This has been a long process that we began in 2011, but our staff has worked very hard to finally achieve our goal,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “The process was very rigorous, and required us to submit more than 470 documents to be reviewed.”

During the process, Clermont County Public Health conducted a Community Health Assessment and created a Community Health Improvement Plan and a strategic plan to help identify the biggest health threats to the community and help guide the direction of the agency in the future.

The Ohio Department of Health has required all 118 local health departments in Ohio be accredited by 2020. With this announcement, Clermont County Public Health becomes only the 18th local health department in Ohio to earn the distinction.

“Throughout the process, we were able to analyze our programs and services and improve in many areas, which will benefit the citizens of Clermont County,” said Nesbit. Accreditation is an on-going process, and once the distinction is earned, it lasts for five years, then the health department will need to re-apply and begin the process again.

# # #

November 13, 2017

Syringe Services Program Open Forum

What are Syringe Services Programs?

Are Syringe Services Programs Legal?

How will a Syringe Services Program be funded in Clermont
County? What will it cost?

Who are the partners involved in bringing a Syringe Services Program to Clermont County?

Why do we need a Syringe Services Program in Clermont County?

Won’t a Syringe Services Program increase crime and drug use in the community?

Won’t a Syringe Services Program just enable a person who uses injection drugs to continue using?

Take the community input survey.


What are Syringe Services Programs?

Syringe Services Programs (SSPs), (legally known in Ohio as Bloodborne Infectious Disease Prevention Programs), are comprehensive public health/harm reduction programs which are intended to reduce the spread of communicable diseases, such as hepatitis and HIV, by providing access to sterile syringes to people who inject drugs. In addition, SSPs serve as an access point for referral to substance use disorder counseling and treatment programs, provide education on the prevention of infection, and offer testing and referral for treatment for hepatitis C and HIV.

It is the intention of Clermont County Public Health to ensure that the above-listed services are provided at a Syringe Services Program in Clermont County.

Are Syringe Services Programs legal?

Yes. The Ohio Revised Code 3707.57 states that a Board of Health may establish a Bloodborne Infectious Disease Prevention Program. In establishing the program, the Board of Health shall determine the manner in which the program is operated and the individuals who are eligible. The program must include the following;

  • Provide on-site screening for bloodborne pathogens (if resources are available);
  • Provide education regarding exposure to bloodborne pathogens;
  • Identify and establish referral agreements with support services providers and substance abuse treatment programs in the area;
  • Encourage program participants to seek medical care, mental health services substance abuse treatment and social services, and make referrals as appropriate;
  • Ensure anonymity of program participants and comply with laws regarding confidentiality;
  • Provide participants with documentation that identifies them as a participant in the program.

Additionally, the Board of Health must consult with interested parties within the health district including: law enforcement, the County Prosecutor, representatives from community addiction services providers, persons in recovery, the local Mental Health and Recovery Board, representatives from the governing authority of the township in which the program will be established, and the community at large.

It is the intention of Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) to provide all of the services required by ORC 3707.57. Additionally, CCPH has consulted with the aforementioned interested parties via formal presentation, face-to-face communication, phone calls, public forum, and anonymous survey. Additional information regarding the legality of a Bloodborne Infectious Disease Prevention Program (i.e., Syringe Services Program) can be found in the Ohio Revised Code 3707.57.

How will a Syringe Services Program be funded in Clermont County? What will it cost?

According to Ohio Revised Code 3707.57, the cost of the program is the responsibility of the Board of Health. In fulfillment of this responsibility, Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) is partnering with the Mercy Health Foundation, who has graciously agreed to provide the majority of funding to initiate the program in Clermont County beginning in 2018. CCPH will also contribute funds toward this effort. Additionally, CCPH seeks out grants and other funding sources on a routine basis which may help defray costs and provide for sustainability.

Currently, the cost to provide a half-day of service on a weekly basis in Clermont County would be $42,000.00 per year. This cost covers the mobile van, program staff, testing services, and supplies. While this may seem like a significant expense, it is important to consider the potential health care savings that may result from a syringe services program. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a single case of HIV can cost $400,000 over the course of a person’s lifetime to treat. Medication cost alone to treat one case of hepatitis C is $94,500. Providing access to clean syringes, education on infection prevention and testing services can significantly reduce the occurrence of these tremendous health care costs.

Who are the partners involved in bringing a Syringe Services Program to Clermont County?

Clermont County Public Health will be partnering with the existing Exchange Project in Cincinnati via a contract with Hamilton County Public Health. This will allow the Exchange Project mobile van to come to Clermont County one half-day per week to provide services. Mercy Hospital Clermont has agreed to provide space in their parking lot where the mobile van will be located.

Why do we need a Syringe Services Program in Clermont County?

Clermont County, like much of the state and the nation, is experiencing an opioid epidemic. In 2016, Clermont County had the fourth highest rate of death due to overdose in Ohio, equating to the loss of 96 lives. This reflects a 96% increase in deaths in our community related to substance misuse since 2011. Likewise, the number of reported cases of hepatitis C, an infectious disease which is readily transmitted through injection drug use, reached 472 in 2016, a 40% increase over the past five years. Additionally, HIV rates have demonstrated a 27% increase among persons living with this illness over the past five years. Harm reduction efforts, such as syringe service programs, have been shown to have a positive impact in all of these areas, making it a valuable tool in the opioid fight.

Won’t a Syringe Services Program increase crime and drug use in the community?

No. Several studies have evaluated crime rates within a community before and after implementation of a syringe services program. Results of this research show no correlation between crime rates and the presences of a SSP.

Won’t a Syringe Services Program just enable a person who uses injection drugs to continue using?

No. In practice, Syringe Services Programs have been shown to reduce drug use, as they provide access to counseling and referrals for treatment services. According to the Centers for Disease Control, people who inject drugs are five times as likely to enter treatment for substance use disorder and are more likely to reduce or stop injecting when they use a Syringe Services Program.

For additional information on Syringe Services Programs, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/ssps.html.

How do I give my input?
You can give your input by filling out our online Syringe Services Program Community Input Survey

November 13, 2017

Syringe Services Program public forum

Clermont County Public Health seeks input on Syringe Services Program

 Batavia, Ohio – Clermont County Public Health wants your input on a proposed Syringe   Services Program. A public forum will be held on Thursday, November 30 from 6:30 – 8 p.m. at the Clermont County Engineer’s Office at 2381 Clermont Center Drive in Batavia. Public comments will also be accepted through an online survey.

Syringe Services Programs (SSPs) are public health programs that are intended to reduce the spread of infectious diseases such as hepatitis and HIV. The SSPs provide access to sterile syringes to people who inject drugs. The program can also make referrals to substance use disorder counseling and treatment programs. They also provide education on the prevention of infection and offer testing and referral for treatment for hepatitis C and HIV.

The proposed program in Clermont County would be a collaborative effort between Clermont County Public Health, Mercy Health – Clermont Hospital, Hamilton County Public Health, and the Exchange Project. A mobile van would come to the hospital parking lot one half-day per week to provide the services.

In Clermont County, the rate of hepatitis C infections have risen by 40 percent, and HIV rates have risen by 27 percent over the last five years. Clermont County ranks fourth in Ohio in drug overdose deaths.

“The Syringe Services Program would be a needed resource in Clermont County,” said Health Commissioner Julianne Nesbit. “The goal of the program is to lower rates of hepatitis C and HIV, while also providing access to treatment to people with substance use disorder.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control, people who inject drugs are five times as likely to enter treatment for substance abuse disorder and are more likely to reduce or stop injecting when they use a Syringe Services Program.

For more information on the Syringe Services Program, or to complete the community survey, visit www.ccphohio.org.

# # #

October 31, 2017

Septic Rehab Program 2018

October 30, 2017

Clermont County Public Health (CCPH) is now accepting applications for the 2018 Septic Rehab Program. The program provides money to low-income homeowners to repair or replace failing septic systems.

To be eligible for the program, applicants must live in Clermont County, meet income eligibility requirements, and own and occupy the home that is attached to the septic system.

If you applied for funding in the past but were denied, we encourage you to apply again.

If your septic system is currently failing, it is important to submit this application before the deadline to avoid additional re-inspections and fees.

Applications should be returned to Clermont County Public Health, 2275 Bauer Road, Batavia, OH 45103 by Friday, December 29, 2017. Copies of income information for all adults in your household must be submitted with the application. Your application will be considered incomplete and will not be considered if proof of income is not included. Staff is available to help you complete the application anytime during regular business hours. After-hours help sessions are scheduled for November 8 and December 13, 2017, from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm at our office. Assistance will be provided on a first come, first served basis. Afterhours help on other days is available by appointment.

Once all of the applications are received, they will be reviewed and ranked in order of need. Priority is given to the systems that are considered to be most in need of repairs.

2018 Septic Rehab Program Plan

Application Packet